Skip Nav

Homework Help

Helping Your Child or Teen with Attention Deficit Disorder

❶Create rules for the home.

More on this...

ADHD and Homework: The Approach
ADHD and Homework Study: Results
Trending in Health

If you are a perfectionist, you will not only be constantly dissatisfied but also create impossible expectations for your child with ADHD. Believe in your child. Think about or make a written list of everything that is positive, valuable, and unique about your child. Trust that your child can learn, change, mature, and succeed. Make thinking about this trust a daily task as you brush your teeth or make your coffee.

If you are overtired or have simply run out of patience, you risk losing sight of the structure and support you have so carefully set up for your child with ADHD. Join an organized support group for parents of children with ADHD. These groups offer a forum for giving and receiving advice, and provide a safe place to vent feelings and share experiences. Friends and family can be wonderful about offering to babysit, but you may feel guilty about leaving your child, or leaving the volunteer with a child with ADHD.

Next time, accept their offer and discuss honestly how best to handle your child. Take care of yourself. Eat right , exercise , and find ways to reduce stress , whether it means taking a nightly bath or practicing morning meditation. If you do get sick, acknowledge it and get help. Children with ADHD are more likely to succeed in completing tasks when the tasks occur in predictable patterns and in predictable places. Your job is to create and sustain structure in your home, so that your child knows what to expect and what they are expected to do.

It is important to set a time and a place for everything to help the child with ADHD understand and meet expectations. Establish simple and predictable rituals for meals, homework, play, and bed. Have your child lay out clothes for the next morning before going to bed, and make sure whatever he or she needs to take to school is in a special place, ready to grab. Use clocks and timers. Allow enough time for what your child needs to do, such as homework or getting ready in the morning.

Use a timer for homework or transitional times, such as between finishing up play and getting ready for bed. Create a quiet place. Make sure your child has a quiet, private space of his or her own.

Do your best to be neat and organized. Set up your home in an organized way. Make sure your child knows that everything has its place. Lead by example with neatness and organization as much as possible. For kids with ADHD, idle time may exacerbate their symptoms and create chaos in your home. It is important to keep a child with ADHD busy without piling on so many things that the child becomes overwhelmed.

Sign your child up for a sport, art class, or music. These can be tasks like helping you cook, playing a board game with a sibling, or drawing a picture. Children with ADHD need consistent rules that they can understand and follow. Make the rules of behavior for the family simple and clear. Write down the rules and hang them up in a place where your child can easily read them. Children with ADHD respond particularly well to organized systems of rewards and consequences.

Finally, stick to your system: As you establish these consistent structures, keep in mind that children with ADHD often receive criticism. Be on the lookout for good behavior—and praise it. Praise is especially important for children who have ADHD because they typically get so little of it.

These children receive correction, remediation, and complaints about their behavior—but little positive reinforcement. A smile, positive comment, or other reward from you can improve the attention, concentration and impulse control of your child with ADHD. Do your best to focus on giving positive praise for appropriate behavior and task completion, while giving as few negative responses as possible to inappropriate behavior or poor task performance.

Reward your child for small achievements that you might take for granted in another child. Children with ADHD often have energy to burn. Organized sports and other physical activities can help them get their energy out in healthy ways and focus their attention on specific movements and skills. The benefits of physical activity are endless: Most importantly for children with attention deficits, however, is the fact that exercise leads to better sleep, which in turn can also reduce the symptoms of ADHD.

Find a sport that your child will enjoy and that suits his or her strengths. Individual or team sports like basketball and hockey that require constant motion are better options. Children with ADHD may also benefit from training in martial arts such as tae kwon do or yoga, which enhance mental control as they work out the body. Insufficient sleep can make anyone less attentive, but it can be highly detrimental for children with ADHD. Kids with ADHD need at least as much sleep as their unaffected peers, but tend not to get what they need.

Their attention problems can lead to overstimulation and trouble falling asleep. A consistent, early bedtime is the most helpful strategy to combat this problem, but it may not completely solve it. Create a buffer time to lower down the activity level for an hour or so before bedtime. Find quieter activities such as coloring, reading or playing quietly.

Spend ten minutes cuddling with your child. This will build a sense of love and security as well as provide a time to calm down. The scent may help to calm your child. There are many varieties available including nature sounds and calming music. Children with ADHD often find "white noise" to be calming. You can create white noise by putting a radio on static or running an electric fan.

If they have homework for several different subjects, you can eliminate much of the hassle simply by helping them to organize their time. It may be a good idea to break homework into sections. You can set aside time for each specific subject, with some relaxation breaks in between. High school age kids with ADHD certainly can do an hour of homework at a time without a break, while first graders may only be able to go for 10 to 15 minutes without a break. You need to determine what you feel is a reasonable amount of study time for your child, and then help him or her to manage their time appropriately.

When they complete their homework successfully, use fun activities such as on TV or video games or whatever your child enjoys as a reward. Finally, a big problem for kids with ADHD is that even when they get the homework completed, they forget to turn it in to the teacher.

Remind him or her to check the clipboard or folder at school for each class to be sure that they turned in all the work. Then, before they leave school, they should check it once again. If they find any assignments that were not turned in they should take it to the teacher or the office and hand it in before they leave the campus. Most teachers will accept an assignment later in the day from a child they know to be attempting to cope with ADHD.

The internet also has great resources to help you and your child gather information for homework projects. These include Kid Info www. You must log in to leave a comment. Create one for free! Responses to questions posted on EmpoweringParents.

We cannot diagnose disorders or offer recommendations on which treatment plan is best for your family. Please seek the support of local resources as needed. If you need immediate assistance, or if you and your family are in crisis, please contact a qualified mental health provider in your area, or contact your statewide crisis hotline.

We value your opinions and encourage you to add your comments to this discussion. We ask that you refrain from discussing topics of a political or religious nature.

Myers earned his Ph. Does your child exhibit angry outbursts , such as tantrums, lashing out, punching walls, and throwing things? Would you like to learn about how to use consequences more effectively? Do you struggle with disrespect or verbal abuse from your child? Has your child been diagnosed with oppositional defiant disorder ODD? Or does your child exhibit a consistent and severe pattern of anger, irritability, arguing, defiance, and vindictiveness toward you or other authority figures?

Explore Everyday Health

Main Topics

Privacy Policy

Homework can be a source of frustration and difficulty particularly for students with ADHD. As a parent, you can help lessen that frustration by creating an organized and comfortable space within your home for your child to do homework.

Privacy FAQs

Aug 16,  · ADHD and Homework: The Approach Kapalka evaluated 39 children, ages 6 to 10, and enrolled the help of their 39 teachers. Teachers taught a mainstream or inclusion class that included at least one student with ADHD.

About Our Ads

Homework assignments can overwhelm and frustrate students with ADHD who struggle with executive functions, focus, and organization. Here, find study and assignment tips for students with attention deficit and learning differences. ADHD and homework is difficult for children because the attention, focus and concentration they need to complete the task are in short supply.

Cookie Info

Homework, homework does anyone really like homework? For a child with ADHD, just getting the assignment written down and the correct books in the book bag to go home . “LearLn yy “aouyyy ch“hyy ildo’nas fr f “I let my son sit on an exercise ball. Being able to move about while doing homework helps kids with ADHD.